Travels among the New Greek Ruins

In the lead-up to the Greek referendum on Sunday, Corinth made a solid showing in news articles, blogs, and commentary. The Guardian called the Corinthia a weather vane of Greek politics and a predictor for the outcome of the referendum, and archaeologist Stephen Miller suggested polling the customers of a local bar in Nemea to gage public opinion on the matter. MSN UK painted the Corinth Canal as a metaphor for the feeling of division in Greece (which, as the vote showed, was less divided on the European Commission agreement than initial polls predicted). Then there was a range of articles that interviewed Corinthians from different villages – to get some perspective outside of the Athens metropolitan area.

This piece (“How Greece Got to No”) yesterday in The Wall Street Journal caught my attention. Christopher Bakken reviews a new book by James Angelos on how the Greek crisis has affected ordinary people and why a “No” vote was so significant. Here’s a taste of the article:

As a Greek-American boy, James Angelos spent summers in his grandmother’s village in Greece. That village was Corinth, which he remembers as a “humble and largely agrarian” backwater that also happened to be situated across the road from the ruins of an ancient city. Push back the soil from any patch of Greek land and you’re likely to reveal something. Mr. Angelos’s timely book, “The Full Catastrophe,” does just that in famous and less well-known sites across the country.

Mr. Angelos, a former Journal correspondent, travels through Greece as a journalist first, and a native son second, to conduct a mostly unpleasant archaeology….

Mr. Angelos’s book allows us to see how these problems play out, sometimes farcically, in the lives of actual people.

Read the rest of the essay here.

Two other interesting pieces caught my eye :

Posted in Modern Corinthia, News Stories, Periods, Modern, Tourism | Leave a comment

American School of Classical Studies Concludes 2015 Season

The American School of Classical Studies Excavations at Corinth announced on Friday the conclusion to their 2015 season which focused this season on continuing excavation in the Frankish quarters, conservation of the Good Luck mosaic, excavation in the area of South Stoa, 3D scans of the Fountain of Peirene, among others. Here’s the news release from Friday:

Our 2015 excavation season at Corinth has come to a successful end as the third session supervisors, Emilio Rodriguez-Alvarez, Phil Katz, and Anna Marie Sitz, wrap up their final reports over the next week. Evidence for the construction date of the Church in the Frankish area will be bolstered by the large numbers of coins retrieved. Elina Salminen excavated and studied burials from the area. Larkin Kennedy acted as the site supervisor and Rossana Valente assisted in the pottery sheds. Conservation and anastylosis also continue in the Frankish area. In the Agonotheteion of the South Stoa excavation reached bedrock in preparation for the resetting of the Eutychia mosaic. Conservation work in the South Stoa, generously funded by the Stockman Family Foundation, continues. Currently Colin Wallace is using photogrammetry to record the 37 mosaic panels. Also during the final session we received a visit from Scott Lee and Matthew Strahan of Cyark who scanned the fountain of Peirene in 3D. Thus, 102 years after Carl Blegan and Emerson Swift slid through the wet muddy tunnels with compass, measuring rod, and candles floating on boards, this old fountain was recorded by archaeologists in yet another fashion.

Related Stories:

Posted in American School Excavations, Digital Corinthia, Periods, Frankish, Periods, Hellenistic, Urban Center | 1 Comment

“Bridge of the Untiring Sea”: Contents

Working through page proofs today for my contribution to the forthcoming Isthmus collection. I have transcribed below the table of contents for the volume, which highlights a chronological arrangement: two essays on the Bronze Age, about 7 essays on the archaic to Hellenistic sanctuary, and 7 essays on the Roman and late Antique Isthmus. Some 13 of the 17 essays deal specifically with Isthmia. While some of the essays explore broader historical issues, this is solid archaeological volume with its strong emphasis on classes of artifacts and particular sites.

I’ll add the bibliography to the Corinthian Studies library in Zotero today. The other front matter for the volume includes new maps of the Isthmus, new authoritative plans of Isthmia, about 160 photos and illustrations, and 6 tables. Look for this volume in print in August or September.

****************************************

Introduction (Elizabeth R. Gebhard and Τimothy E. Gregory)

Chapter 1. An Early Mycenaean Habitation Site at Kyras Vrysi (Eleni Balomenou and Vasili Tassinos)

Chapter 2. The Settlement at Kalamianos: Bronze Age Small Worlds and the Saronic Coast of the Southeastern Corinthia (Thomas F. Tartaron)

Chapter 3. The Archaic Temple of Poseidon: Problems of Design and Invention (Frederick P. Hemans)

Chapter 4. The Domestic Architecture of the Rachi Settlement at Isthmia (Virginia R. Anderson-Stojanović)

Chapter 5. City, Sanctuary, and Feast: Dining Vessels from the Archaic Reservoir in the Sanctuary of Poseidon (Martha K. Risser)

Chapter 6. The Temple Deposit at Isthmia and the Dating of Archaic and Early Classical Greek Coins (Liane Houghtalin)

Chapter 7. Riding for Poseidon: Terracotta Figurines from the Sanctuary of Poseidon (Arne Thomsen)

Chapter 8. The Chigi Painter at Isthmia? (K. W. Arafat)

Chapter 9. Arms from the Age of Philip and Alexander at Broneer’s West Foundation near Isthmia (A. H. Jackson)

Chapter 10. New Sculptures from the Isthmian Palaimonion (Mary C. Sturgeon)

Chapter 11. Agonistic Festivals, Victors, and Officials in the Time of Nero: An Inscribed Herm from the Gymnasium Area of Corinth (James Wiseman)

Chapter 12. Roman Baths at Isthmia and Sanctuary Baths in Greece (Fikret K.Yegül)

Chapter 13. The Roman Buildings East of the Temple of Poseidon on the Isthmus (Steven J. R. Ellis and Eric E. Poehler)

Chapter 14. Corinthian Suburbia: Patterns of Roman Settlement on the Isthmus (David K. Pettegrew)

Chapter 15. Work Teams on the Isthmian Fortress and the Development of a Later Roman Architectural Aesthetic (Jon M. Frey)

Chapter 16. Epigraphy, Liturgy, and Imperial Policy on the Justinianic Isthmus (William R. Caraher)

Chapter 17. Circular Lamps in the Late Antique Peloponnese (Birgitta Lindros Wohl)

Posted in Bibliography, Conferences, Isthmia, Isthmus | Leave a comment

“The Bridge of the Untiring Sea”. A New Book about the Isthmus

The closest I came to the Corinthia this year was a flight over the Isthmus en route to JFK from Athens. A very busy spring semester led directly to a productive field and museum season of the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project in May-early June. Now that I’m back in the US and the summer stretches before me, I have a little more time to release some Corinthiaka updates, news items, and reviews.

One important update is that the long-awaited book titled “The Bridge of the Untiring Sea”: The Corinthian Isthmus from Prehistory to Late Antiquity, has now entered proof stage and is scheduled for publication in late August. Edited by Elizabeth R. Gebhard and Timothy E. Gregory, this work publishes a conference held in 2007 at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens to celebrate 50 years of archaeological work at Isthmia and across the broader Isthmus. Here’s the book cover and description:

Pindar’s metaphor of the Isthmus as a bridge spanning two seas encapsulates the essence of the place and gives a fitting title for this volume of essays on the history and archaeology of the area. The Isthmus, best known for the panhellenic sanctuary of Poseidon, attracted travelers both before and after Pausanias’s visit in the 2nd century A.D., but only toward the end of the 19th century were the ruins investigated and, after another half century, finally systematically excavated. More recently, archaeologists have surveyed the territory beyond the sanctuary, compiling evidence for a varied picture of activity on the wider Isthmus and the eastern Corinthia. The 17 essays in this book celebrate 55 years of research on the Isthmus and provide a comprehensive overview of the state of our knowledge. Topics include an early Mycenaean habitation site at Kyras Vrysi; the settlement at Kalamianos; the Archaic Temple of Poseidon; domestic architecture of the Rachi settlement; dining vessels from the Sanctuary of Poseidon; the Temple Deposit at Isthmia and the dating of Archaic and early Classical Greek coins; terracotta figurines from the Sanctuary of Poseidon; the Chigi Painter; arms from the age of Philip and Alexander at Broneer’s West Foundation on the road to Corinth; new sculptures from the Isthmian Palaimonion; an inscribed herm from the Gymnasium-Bath complex of Corinth; Roman baths at Isthmia and sanctuary baths in Greece; Roman buildings east of the Temple of Poseidon; patterns of settlement and land use on the Roman Isthmus; epigraphy, liturgy, and Imperial policy on the Justinianic Isthmus; and circular lamps in the Late Antique Peloponnese.

I’m jazzed to see this volume in print. I have not seen any of these pieces other my own (obviously!) and Caraher’s piece on the Justinianic Isthmus. Most of the essays in the volume naturally focus on areas where the most fieldwork has occurred, especially in and around the Panhellenic sanctuary at Isthmia. A few consider the broader landscape of the eastern Corinthia including even places that are not on the Isthmus such as Kalamianos in the southeast Corinthia. 

Here’s the publication page for the book at the ASCSA website. The book is available for pre-ordering at Oxbow and Amazon, among other places.

Posted in EKAS (Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey), Isthmia, Isthmus, Territory | Leave a comment

Conference on Ancient Arcadia

About all I’ve had to do this semester with Corinthian Matters is post a series of conference proposals. Here’s one related to a conference on ancient Arcadia:

February 11th‒12th, 2016

International Symposion

Arkadien im Altertum – Geschichte und Kultur einer antiken Gebirgslandschaft

Ancient Arcadia ‒ History and Culture of a Mountainous Region

 

After five years of archaeological research conducted by the University of Graz and the EFA Korinthias in a joint project at Archaia Pheneos, the University of Graz (Center of Antiquity, Institute of Archaeology, Institute of Ancient History) will hold an international symposium dedicated to ancient Arcadia and its historical, demographical and cultural peculiarities.

 

At this symposium the following topics will be dealt with

· Arcadian poleis: historical and archaeological evidence

· Prehistoric Arcadia

· Arcadian art

· Cult and religion in ancient Arcadia

· The image of Arcadia in ancient texts and its later adoption

· Economy and traffic in the mountains of Arcadia

· Arcadia and its role in Greek history

· Roman Arcadia

· Language and written records of Arcadia

 

We would like to invite all colleagues working in the field of Archaeology, Ancient History, Classical Philology or Linguistics to participate in this meeting and to contribute by sending us papers. Seite: 3/3 ‒ 18. März 2015

 

Veranstaltungsort: Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz

Conference location: Universitätsplatz 3, A-8010 Graz

http://www.uni-graz.at/

 

Organisation: Dr. Michaela Zinko (Zentrum Antike)

 

Organizers: michaela.zinko@uni-graz.at

Mag. Hanne Maier (Institut für Archäologie)

hanne.maier@uni-graz.at

 

Veranstaltungssprache: Deutsch

Conference language: English

 

Tagungsgebühr: € 60,00

Conference fee: € 30,00 (für Studierende/for students)

 

Tagungskomitee / Conference committee:

Ao. Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Manfred Lehner (Institut für Archäologie)

Priv.-Doz. Mag. Dr. Elisabeth Trinkl (Institut für Archäologie)

Ao. Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Sabine Tausend (Institut für Alte Geschichte und Altertumskunde)

Ao. Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Klaus Tausend (Zentrum Antike)

Ass.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Michaela Zinko (Zentrum Antike)

 

Wir bitten Interessenten, das Thema des Vortrages in einem kurzen Konzept

(max. 200 Worte) entsprechend darzustellen und mit der Vortrags-

Anmeldung bis spätestens 29.05.2015 einzureichen.

Die endgültige Auswahl der Referate obliegt dem Tagungskomitee.

 

Please submit your registration form together with a short abstract (max. 200 words) of the title of your paper by May 29th, 2015 at the latest. The conference committee is responsible for the final selection of the submitted papers.

 

Posted in Conferences | Leave a comment

Deserted Villages Session: AIA 2016

Another interesting conference session is in the works—this one for the 2016 meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America on the theme of “Deserted Villages.” I had never seen as much talk on FB about “abandonment” and “formation processes” as the day last summer when friends began to bandy about this session idea.

Proposed Colloquium Session for the 2016 AIA Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, January 6-9, 2016

Organizers: Deb Brown Stewart and Kostis Kourelis on behalf of the Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group, Archaeological Institute of America

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: March 13, 2015

The Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group invites proposals for papers on the topic “Deserted Villages” for a colloquium at the next AIA Annual Meeting. Of particular interest are papers that feature post-classical sites (late-antique, medieval, or post-medieval villages) and that address:

– definitions of “village” (archaeological or ethnographic),

– new fieldwork or new interpretations of data,

– research that brings together diverse sources of data, and

– historic preservation concerns.

The selected proposals will shape a fuller abstract for the colloquium.

If you have a suitable paper or idea, please send (1) authors’ names, (2) institutional affiliations, (3) contact information, (4) paper title, (5) approximate length of time for your presentation (no more than 20 minutes), and (6) an abstract (no more than 400 words and conforming to “AIA Style Guidelines for Annual Meeting Abstracts”) by March 13th to Deb Brown Stewart, debbrownstewart@gmail.com

Corinth_June 12 021_m

Posted in Conferences, EKAS (Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey), Landscape, Modern Corinthia, Periods, Late Antiquity, Periods, Medieval, Periods, Modern, Periods, Ottoman, Southern Corinthia | Leave a comment

The Future of Ancient History: Teaching the Past in the Modern Curriculum

Just got this circular via the listserve of the Association of Ancient Historians. Looks like an interesting session in the works for the 2016 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in San Francisco. I don’t really know that history enrollments have declined overall in a macro sense (we’ve discussed this at length in my own department meetings) but I do think that ancient historians have a unique contribution to make within history departments.

The Future of Ancient History: Teaching the Past in the Modern Curriculum

Sponsored by the SCS Committee on Ancient History

Denise Demetriou (Michigan State University), Organizer

Like other humanistic enterprises, the study and teaching of Ancient History faces several challenges in the current historical moment – economic, technological, cultural, and political, among others.  Knowledge of history is seen as impractical, having little public value, and not preparing students sufficiently for today’s vocational marketplace.  Yet, while enrollments in the field of History have declined overall, those in the sub-field of Ancient History have not suffered to the same degree, if at all.  This suggests that Ancient History is particularly well-poised to meet the challenges it faces: it can rearticulate not only its intrinsic value but also how it can contribute to the study and teaching of other fields, such as Political Science, Literary Criticism, Economics, Gender & Sexuality Studies, and even the STEM disciplines.

The Committee on Ancient History invites scholars and students of ancient history to submit abstracts for papers that explore any aspect of the pedagogical contributions Ancient History can make to other disciplines and its unique role in the curricula of public and private universities, liberal arts colleges, community colleges, and high schools.  Questions the papers might address include but are not limited to:

· Distinct interdisciplinary modes of inquiry in ancient history

· Unique contributions to student learning outcomes

· Special vantage points from which to consider contemporary issues

· The place of ancient history in the modern curriculum

· Collaborative or team-taught courses across disciplines

Please submit anonymous abstracts for a talk no longer than 20 minutes as an email attachment to Denise Demetriou (demetri1@msu.edu) by March 2, 2015.  Abstracts should follow the SCS guidelines for formatting abstracts (http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-of-abstracts), and will be peer-reviewed anonymously by the SCS Committee on Ancient History.

Posted in Conferences | Leave a comment

The First Urban Churches: Roman Corinth (In the Works)

A couple of years ago, I had the good fortune of participating in a session at the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) conference on the theme of Polis and Ekklesia: Investigations of Urban Christianity. The paper I delivered outlined new perspectives on the diolkos and the implications of this research for understanding the commercial backdrop of the early Christian communities at Corinth.

The good news is that this session will soon be published by SBL as part of a multi-volume series on Polis and Ekklesia edited by James R Harrison and L.L. Welborn. The first three volumes are either in the works or forthcoming:

The First Urban Churches. Volume 1: Methodology: As the editors

have summarized this volume, “This book, comprising all the invited papers of SBL Consultation Polis and Ekklesia (SanFranciso, 2011) and with the addition of other solicited contributions, concentrates on the responsible use of documentary (papyrological, epigraphic), numismatic, iconographic, and archaeological evidence in reconstructing the historical, social, cultural, and economic life of cities, their inhabitants and neighbours in antiquity. This volume forms a preface to the study of the significant biblical cities in the first-century AD, charted in the subsequent eight volumes of the series.”

The First Urban Churches. Volume 2: Roman Corinth. According to the editors, “This book, comprising all the papers of SBL Consultation Polis and Ekklesia (Chicago, 2012) and with the addition of other solicited contributions, concentrates on the epigraphic, numismatic, iconographic, and archaeological evidence in reconstructing the historical, social, cultural, and economic life of Roman Corinth in the early Christian era.”

The First Urban Churches. Volume 3: Ephesus. According to the editors, “This book, comprising all the papers of SBL Consultation Polis and Ekklesia (Baltimore, 2013) and with the addition of other solicited contributions, concentrates on the epigraphic, numismatic, iconographic, and archaeological evidence in reconstructing the historical, social, cultural, and economic life of Ephesus in the early Christian era.”

Here’s an outline for the second volume on Roman Corinth, which is scheduled for delivery to the press later this year: 

1. Laurence L. Welborn, “Polis and Ekklesia: Investigating Roman Corinth in Its Urban Context”

2. Cavan Concannon, “Negotiating Multiple Modes of Religion and Identity at Roman Corinth”

3. Kathy Ehrensperger, “Negotiating Polis and Ekklesia: Challenge and Re-Assurance in 1 Cor 12:1-11”

4. Michael Peppard, “Roman Controversiae about Inheritance Disputes and 1 Corinthians 6”

5. David Pettegrew, “Lost in the Country: Corinthian Territory and the Early Christian Communities of the 1st Century CE”

6. Annette Weisenreider, “Bodies and Space: Sitting or Reclining in 1 Corinthians 14:30”

7. Brad Bitner, “Τὰ γραφέντα PRO ROSTRIS LECTA: Bilingual Inscribing in Roman Corinth”

8. Fredrick J Long, “‘The god of This Age’ (2 Cor 4:4) and Paul’s Empire-Resisting Gospel”

9. Laurence L. Welborn, “Paul, the Politics of ‘Equality’ and the Power Monopoly of the Corinthian Elite”

10. James R Harrison, “The Cursus Honorum in the Roman Colonies of Corinth and Philippi: Consequences for Paul’s Gospel and Rhetoric”

I spent much of January revising my 2012 conference paper and adding substance. My chapter, “Lost in the Country: Corinthian Territory and the Early Christian Communities of the 1st Century CE,” offers case studies in how the countryside / landscape might intersect with the study of the first Christians. In particular, I want to highlight the territory as a fundamental part of the “polis” in Roman times. Here’s the working abstract.

“Corinthian territory has occupied a paradoxical role in the modern scholarship surrounding Paul’s mission to Corinth and the Christian community in conflict. In one respect, the isthmian crossroads has functioned as an essential backdrop to understanding the population’s maritime orientation, commercial proclivities, and general tendencies to immorality and division. The twin harbors of Lechaion and Kenchreai, the pan-Hellenic sanctuary at Isthmia, and the diolkos allegedly made Corinth a city of transients at a great crossroads of the ancient world. In another respect, scholars have regularly disregarded the territory in their discussions of the Corinthian correspondence as though the region beyond the city’s boundaries was of little concern or interest to the earliest Christians. In this paper, I propose a different way of thinking about the intersections of the early Christian community with the countryside. Through a series of case studies on the diolkos, canal, harbors, and agriculture, I highlight the contingent developments of the territory and their effects on the developing ekklesia. The region was not a timeless commercial thoroughfare but developed historically in the course of the first century CE. This paper, then, recommends greater attention to the historical developments of the territory and their influence on the local religious communities.”

I’ll post more as this collection of essays moves toward publication.

Posted in Agriculture, Book and Article Reviews, Canal, Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - Churches, Christian - St. Paul, Diolkos, Periods, Roman, Territory, Urban Center | Leave a comment

2013-2014 Publications in Corinthian Studies: New Testament, Christianity, and Judaism

This is the fourth and final post in a series of bibliographic releases of new Corinthian scholarship published or digitized in 2013-2014. See this post last last Monday for further information about the sources of this bibliography and instructions for accessing the Zotero database. For earlier releases, see these posts:

Today’s list presents scholarship published or digitized in 2013 and 2014 related in some way to the subjects of Christianity, Judaism, and early Christianity. This includes some scholarship on the Hellenistic and early Roman “backgrounds” of Christianity and Judaism but most of this material focus directly on questions of religion.

Screenshot (31)

I have divided these reports by year to keep them manageable. Download the PDFs by right clicking on these link:

I generated these reports through Zotero tags and searches, and there are undoubtedly missing entries as well as false positives. For best results, visit the Zotero library or download the RIS file into your bibliographic program.

If you see references missing from the list, please send to corinthianmatters@gmail.com

Posted in Bibliography, Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - Churches, Christian - Patristic Interpretation, Christian - Post-Pauline, Christian - Saints, Christian - St. Paul, Judaism, Periods, Hellenistic, Periods, Late Antiquity, Periods, Medieval, Periods, Modern, Periods, Roman, Roman Religion, Territory, Texts, Urban Center | Leave a comment

Paul and the Rhetoric of Reversal in 1 Corinthians (Malcolm): A Review

As I work to gather the treasure trove of new New Testament scholarship of 2013-2014 into a long PDF report or two, the mid-Atlantic and east coast of the U.S. are gearing up for violent winter storm Juno, which shall just graze us here in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, but will dump several feet of snow on our neighbors to the northeast. In the meantime, you can feast on this recent review at Themelios of Matthew Malcolm’s recent work, Paul and the Rhetoric of Reversal in 1 Corinthians: The Impact of Paul’s Gospel on His Macro-Rhetoric, Cambridge 2013.

Malcolm is a sometimes blogger here at Corinthian Matters and runs his own blog with plentiful Corinthiaka at Cryptotheology. I saw him deliver a brilliant talk on the subject of his book (“kerygmatic rhetoric”) at the international meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature conference in London several years ago. I was not surprised to see this positive review.


Paul and the Rhetoric of Reversal in 1 CorinthiansHere’s the Abstract: “The first letter to the Corinthians is one of the most discussed biblical books in New Testament scholarship today. Despite this, there has been no consensus on its arrangement and central theme, in particular why the topic of the resurrection was left until the end of the letter, and what its theological significance would have been to the Corinthian church. Matthew R. Malcolm analyses this rhetoric of ‘reversal’, examines the unity of the epistle, and addresses key problems behind particular chapters. He argues that while Jewish and Greco-Roman resources contribute significantly to the overall arrangement of the letter, Paul writes as one whose identity and rhetorical resources of structure and imagery have been transformed by his preaching, or kerygma, of Christ. The study will be of interest to students of New Testament studies, Pauline theology and early Christianity.”

And a taste of Drake’s review at Themelios:

“The letter of 1 Corinthians is greatly discussed within New Testament scholarship. One of the matters that needs resolution is its arrangement and central theme. In other words, is there any particular reason as to why Paul begins with wisdom, proceeds to sexual immorality, then on to weak and strong brothers, the use of spiritual gifts, and then concludes with the resurrection? Is he addressing the greatest needs at Corinth first, or is there some reason as to why he has arranged the letter in this way? Several scholars have seen these issues within 1 Corinthians to be unrelated while others find a continuity of thought. Matthew Malcolm proposes that it is the nature of Paul’s preached message that accounts for the movement from cross and sacrifice to resurrection. He believes that this provides the better explanation over appeals to Greco-Roman rhetoric or Jewish literary methods….

Paul and the Rhetoric of Reversal in 1 Corinthians contributes significant data to the question of the coherence and arrangement of the epistle. It rightly accentuates how Paul’s message of the crucified and risen Messiah provides a key theme for considering the arrangement of the entirety of the letter. It also rightly encourages a theological and pastoral consideration of the letter. It will be of great interest to those working in Pauline theology, Corinthian studies, and rhetorical studies.”

Read the rest of the review here.

New Testament scholarship reports tomorrow or Wednesday, I hope.

Posted in Book and Article Reviews, Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - St. Paul | 1 Comment