Pope Francis on Poverty and the Logic of Divine Love

When Palladius, the author of the Lausiac History, wanted to expose a pseudo-monk named Valens in the early fifth century AD, he called him “a Corinthian—for St. Paul charged the Corinthians with arrogance.” St. Ambrose, the powerful bishop of Milan and one of the so-called “doctors” of the western church, commented on 1 Corinthians 5:1 that “the house of Corinth stank…There was a stench, for a little leaven had corrupted the whole lump.”

Justifiably or not, the earliest worshipers of Christ in Corinth were remembered in church history as the Christian community with problems. St. Paul enumerates them in the first letter to the Corinthians in rapid succession: problems of vanity, division, arrogance and power (Ch. 1-4); problems of sex, lawsuits, and marriage (Ch. 5-7), problems of idolatry and arrogance (again!) (Ch. 8-10), problems of worship and division (again) (Ch. 11-14), and problems of belief (Ch. 15). Reading the letter straightforwardly and literally, one could only conclude with Basil of Caesarea that “Those in Corinth were infants, in need of milk.”

When I gave my first presentation on Christianity in Corinth yesterday evening at the Cathedral Parish of St. Patrick (Harrisburg, PA), I noted that it was precisely the humanness of the Corinthian community that has (historically) made the Corinthian correspondence a frequent subject of commentary and teaching.

It also explains why passages from 1 and 2 Corinthians are used in eastern and western liturgical cycles during the season of Lent. With the themes of self-denial, renunciation, spiritual exercise, and charity, the letters offer a wide range of instructive teaching for spiritual pilgrimage. There are passages about repentance, conversion, and reconciliation (2 Cor. 5:17-6.2); the foolishness of Christ crucified and the message of the cross (1 Cor. 1:18-25); spiritual food and drink and temptation in the wilderness (1 Cor. 10.1-3); endurance through temptations and trials (2 Cor. 5:20-6:10); power in weakness (2 Cor. 4:6-15); and the celebration of the Paschal feast (1 Cor. 5:6-8; 11:23-26). And the long passage about resurrection in 1 Corinthians (1 Cor. 15) is regularly used at the season’s conclusion in Easter Sunday.

For this week’s Lenten Wednesday series, Pope Francis reflects on a passage of 2 Corinthians less commonly associated with the season — or at least in the cycle of readings. In 2 Corinthians 8:9, St. Paul puts voluntary poverty at the heart of the incarnation: “For you know the generous act of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, so that by his poverty you might become rich.” (NRSV)

In his first Lenten message, Pope Francis discusses the mystery of poverty in the incarnation and the logic of divine love. I copy the opening of the message below. You can read the full sermon in English here.

“Dear Brothers and Sisters,

As Lent draws near, I would like to offer some helpful thoughts on our path of conversion as individuals and as a community. These insights are inspired by the words of Saint Paul: “For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that by his poverty you might become rich” (2 Cor8:9). The Apostle was writing to the Christians of Corinth to encourage them to be generous in helping the faithful in Jerusalem who were in need. What do these words of Saint Paul mean for us Christians today? What does this invitation to poverty, a life of evangelical poverty, mean for us today?

1. Christ’s grace

First of all, it shows us how God works. He does not reveal himself cloaked in worldly power and wealth but rather in weakness and poverty: “though He was rich, yet for your sake he became poor …”. Christ, the eternal Son of God, one with the Father in power and glory, chose to be poor; he came amongst us and drew near to each of us; he set aside his glory and emptied himself so that he could be like us in all things (cf. Phil2:7; Heb 4:15). God’s becoming man is a great mystery! But the reason for all this is his love, a love which is grace, generosity, a desire to draw near, a love which does not hesitate to offer itself in sacrifice for the beloved. Charity, love, is sharing with the one we love in all things. Love makes us similar, it creates equality, it breaks down walls and eliminates distances. God did this with us. Indeed, Jesus “worked with human hands, thought with a human mind, acted by human choice and loved with a human heart. Born of the Virgin Mary, he truly became one of us, like us in all things except sin.” (Gaudium et Spes, 22).”………..

Posted in Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - Saints, Christian - St. Paul | Leave a comment

Coming Soon: The Apocalypse

A new Oxford Handbook due April 14, with obvious relevance for understanding the broader ancient context for particular passages in 1 and 2 Corinthians such as Paul’s vision and the third heaven (2 Corinthians 12:1-4), the parousia and the resurrection of the dead (1 Corinthians 15), the passing world and last times (1 Cor. 7:29-31):

  • Collins, John J., ed. The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

You can preorder via Amazon. The description of the book at OUP website:

The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature

“Apocalypticism arose in ancient Judaism in the last centuries BCE and played a crucial role in the rise of Christianity. It is not only of historical interest: there has been a growing awareness, especially since the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, of the prevalence of apocalyptic beliefs in the contemporary world. To understand these beliefs, it is necessary to appreciate their complex roots in the ancient world, and the multi-faceted character of the phenomenon of apocalypticism.

The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature is a thematic and phenomenological exploration of apocalypticism in the Judaic and Christian traditions. Most of the volume is devoted to the apocalyptic literature of antiquity. Essays explore the relationship between apocalypticism and prophecy, wisdom and mysticism; the social function of apocalypticism and its role as resistance literature; apocalyptic rhetoric from both historical and postmodern perspectives; and apocalyptic theology, focusing on phenomena of determinism and dualism and exploring apocalyptic theology’s role in ancient Judaism, early Christianity, and Gnosticism.

The final chapters of the volume are devoted to the appropriation of apocalypticism in the modern world, reviewing the role of apocalypticism in contemporary Judaism and Christianity, and more broadly in popular culture, addressing the increasingly studied relation between apocalypticism and violence, and discussing the relationship between apocalypticism and trauma, which speaks to the underlying causes of the popularity of apocalyptic beliefs. This volume will further the understanding of a vital religious phenomenon too often dismissed as alien and irrational by secular western society.

Readership: Students and scholars of the Bible, apocalyptic literature, theology, and history, millennialism, Judaic and Christian traditions”

The Table of Contents from the same OUP page:

Contributors
Preface
1. What is Apocalyptic Literature? – John J. Collins

Part I. The Literary and Phenomenological Context
2. Apocalyptic Prophecy – Stephen L. Cook
3. The Inheritance of Prophecy in Apocalypse – Hindy Najman
4. Wisdom and Apocalypticism – Matthew Goff
5. Scriptural Interpretation in Early Jewish Apocalypses – Alex P. Jassen
6. Apocalyptic Literature and the Study of Early Jewish Mysticism – Ra’anan Boustan and Patrick G. McCullough
7. Dreams and Visions in Early Jewish and Early Christian Apocalypses and Apocalypticism – Frances Flannery

Part II. The Social Function of Apocalyptic Literature
8. Social-Scientific Approaches to Apocalyptic Literature – Philip F. Esler
9. Jewish Apocalyptic Literature as Resistance Literature – Anathea Portier-Young
10. Apocalypse and Empire - Stephen J. Friesen
11. A Postcolonial Reading of Apocalyptic Literature – Daniel L. Smith-Christopher

Part III. Literary Features of Apocalyptic Literature
12. The Rhetoric of Jewish Apocalyptic Literature – Carol A. Newsom
13. Early Christian Apocalyptic Rhetoric – Greg Carey
14. Deconstructing Apocalyptic Literalist Allegory – Erin Runions

Part IV. Apocalyptic Theology
15. Apocalyptic Determinism – Mladen Popovic
16. Apocalyptic Dualism – Jörg Frey
17. Apocalyptic Ethics and Behavior – Dale C. Allison, Jr.
18. Apocalypse and Torah in Ancient Judaism – Matthias Henze
19. Apocalypticism and Christian Origins – Adela Yarbro Collins
20. Descents to Hell and Ascents to Heaven in Apocalyptic Literature – Jan N. Bremmer
21. Apocalypses amongst Gnostics and Manichaeans – Dylan M. Burns
22. The Imagined World of the Apocalypses – Stefan Beyerle

Part V. Apocalypse Now
23. Messianism as a Political Power in Contemporary Judaism -Motti Inbari
24. Apocalypticism and Radicalism – Christopher Rowland
25. Apocalypse and Violence – Catherine Wessinger
26. Apocalypticism in Contemporary Christianity – Amy Johnson Frykholm
27. Apocalypse and Trauma – Dereck Daschke
28. Apocalypticism and Popular Culture – Lorenzo DiTommaso

Index

Posted in Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - St. Paul | Leave a comment

Corinthian Scholarship Monthly (December-February). Part 1

With the end of last semester, holidays, and deadlines, I fell a bit behind on the Corinthian Scholarship Monthly posts. Yesterday I started to dig out, sift through emails, and find the gems in the bunch. This will be the first of two posts on new scholarship that went live in December to February. I’ll try to get the second part of CSM Dec-Feb by the middle of the month.

And kudos to the google bots for doing such a good job. While we’ve been sleeping, playing, teaching, and resting, those bots have been working non-stop to bring all sorts of little nuggets to our network. As always, I’ve included a broader range of articles and essays that mention the Corinthia without focusing on the region — on the assumption that you will be as interested as I am in a broader Mediterranean context. There are also a few entries from past years that the bots have just brought to my attention.

You can find the full collection of articles and books related to Corinthian studies at the Corinthian Studies Zotero Page. The new entries are tagged according to basic categories. Version 2 of the library in RIS format is scheduled to be released by summer.

Finally, I am always looking for reviewers of articles or books listed in the CSM posts. If you can write and are qualified, drop me a line.

********************************************************

Ambraseys, N. N. “Ottoman Archives and the Assessment of the Seismicity of Greece 1456–1833.” Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering 12, no. 1 (February 1, 2014): 5–43. doi:10.1007/s10518-013-9541-5.

Angeli Bernardini, Paola, ed. Corinto: luogo di azione e luogo di racconto : atti del convengo internazionale, Urbino, 23-25 settembre 2009. Pisa [etc.]: F. Serra, 2013.

Baika, Kalliopi. “The Topography of Shipshed Complexes and Naval Dockyards.” In Shipsheds of the Ancient Mediterranean, edited by David Blackman and Boris Rankov, 185–209. Cambridge University Press, 2013. 

Balzat, Jean-Sébastien, and Benjamin W. Millis. “M. Antonius Aristocrates: Provincial Involvement with Roman Power in the Late 1st Century B.C.” Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 82, no. 4 (December 2013): 651–672. doi:10.2972/hesperia.82.4.0651.

Blackman, David, and Boris Rankov. Shipsheds of the Ancient Mediterranean. Cambridge University Press, 2013. 

Borbonus, Dorian. Columbarium Tombs and Collective Identity in Augustan Rome. Cambridge University Press, 2014. 

Boyle, A. J., ed. Seneca: Medea: Edited with Introduction, Translation, and Commentary. Oxford University Press, 2014.

Collins, John J., ed. The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Docter, Roald, and Babette Bechtold. “Two Forgotten Amphorae from the Hamburg Excavations at Carthage (Cyprus, and the Iberian Peninsula) and Their Contexts.” Carthage Studies 5 (2011) (2013): 91–128.

Forbes, Hamish A. “Off-Site Scatters and the Manuring Hypothesis in Greek Survey Archaeology: An Ethnographic Approach.” Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens 82, no. 4 (December 2013): 551–594. doi:10.2972/hesperia.82.4.0551.

Frangoulidis, Stavros. “Reception of Strangers in Apuleius’ Metamorphoses: The Examples of Hypata and Cenchreae.” In A Companion to the Ancient Novel, edited by Edmund P. Cueva and Shannon N. Byrne, 275–287. Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

Hall, Jonathan M. Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. 

Hawthorn, Geoffrey. Thucydides on Politics: Back to the Present. Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Heil, Andreas, and Gregor Damschen, eds. Brill’s Companion to Seneca: Philosopher and Dramatist. Leiden: Brill, 2013. 

Hollander, William den. Josephus, the Emperors, and the City of Rome: From Hostage to Historian. Leiden: Brill, 2014. 

James, Paula. “Apuleius’ Metamorphoses: A Hybrid Text?” In A Companion to the Ancient Novel, edited by Edmund P. Cueva and Shannon N. Byrne, 317–329. Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

Jeffreys, Elizabeth. “We Need to Talk about Byzantium: Or, Byzantium, Its Reception of the Classical World as Discussed in Current Scholarship, and Should Classicists Pay Attention?Classical Receptions Journal 6, no. 1 (January 1, 2014): 158–174. doi:10.1093/crj/clt032.

Kamen, Deborah. “Sale for the Purpose of Freedom: Slave-Prostitutes and Manumission in Ancient Greece.” The Classical Journal 109, no. 3 (March 2014): 281–307. doi:10.5184/classicalj.109.3.0281.

Kampbell, Sarah Marie. “The Economy of Conflict: How East Mediterranean Trade Adapted to Changing Rules, Allegiances and Demographics in the  10th – 12th Centuries AD.” PhD Thesis, Princeton University, 2014. 

Klapaki. “The Journey to Greece in the American and the Greek Modernist Literary Imagination: Henry Miller and George Seferis.” In Travel, Discovery, Transformation: Culture and Civilization, Volume 6, edited by Gabriel R. Ricci, 59–78. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2014.

Kolluoğlu, Biray, and Meltem Toksöz, eds. Cities of the Mediterranean: From the Ottomans to the Present Day. I.B.Tauris, 2010. 

Korner, Ralph J. “Before ‘Church’: Political, Ethno-Religious, and Theological Implications of the Collective Designation of Pauline Christ Followers as Ekklēsiai.” PhD Thesis, McMaster University, 2014. 

Kreitzer, L.J. “Hadrian as Nero Redivivus: Some Supporting Evidence from Corinth.” In Judaea and Rome in Coins 65 BCE-135 CE: Papers Presented at the International Conference Hosted by Spink, 13th-14th September 2010, edited by David M Jacobson and Nikos Kokkinos, 229–242. London: Spink, 2012. 

Legarreta-Castillo, Felipe De Jesus. The Figure of Adam in Romans 5 and 1 Corinthians 15: The New Creation and Its Ethical and Social Reconfigurations. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2014.

Matz, Brian J. “Early Christian Philanthropy as a ‘Marketplace’ and the Moral Responsibility of Market Participants.” In Distant Markets, Distant Harms: Economic Complicity and Christian Ethics, edited by Daniel Finn, 115–145? New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Mitski, Efterpi. “Commodifying Antiquity in Mary Nisbet’s Journey to the Ottoman Empire.” In Travel, Discovery, Transformation: Culture and Civilization, Volume 6, edited by Gabriel R. Ricci, 45–58. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2014. 

Morhange, Christophe, Amos Salamon, Guénaelle Bony, Clément Flaux, Ehud Galili, Jean-Philippe Goiran, and Dov Zviely. “Geoarchaeology of Tsunamis and the Revival of Neo-Catastrophism in the Eastern Mediterranean.” Rome “La Sapienza” Studies on the Archaeology of Palestine & Transjordan 11 (2014): 61–81.

Ong, H. T. “Paul’s Personal Relation with Earliest Christianity: A Critical Survey.” Currents in Biblical Research 12, no. 2 (February 7, 2014): 146–172. doi:10.1177/1476993X12467114.

Pachis, Panayotis. “Data from Dead Minds?  Dream and Healing in the Isis / Sarapis Cult During the Graeco-Roman Age.” Journal of Cognitive Historiography 1, no. 1 (January 23, 2014): 52–71.

Pallis, Georgios. “Inscriptions on Middle Byzantine Marble Templon Screens.” Byzantinische Zeitschrift 106, no. 2 (January 2013): 761–810. doi:10.1515/bz-2013-0026.

Polinskaya, Irene. A Local History of Greek Polytheism: Gods, People and the Land of Aigina, 800-400 BCE. Leiden: Brill, 2013. 

Priestley, Jessica. Herodotus and Hellenistic Culture: Literary Studies in the Reception of the Histories. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 

Punt, Jeremy. “Framing Human Dignity through Domination and Submission? Negotiating Borders and Loyalties (of Power) in the New Testament.” Scriptura 112 (2013): 1–17. doi:10.7833/112-0-82.

Rankov, Boris. “Slipping and Launching.” In Shipsheds of the Ancient Mediterranean, edited by David Blackman and Boris Rankov, 102–123. Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Reed, David Alan. “Paul on Marriage and Singleness:  Reading 1 Corinthians with the Augustan Marriage Laws.” PhD Thesis. University of St. Michael’s College, 2013. 

Saliari, Konstantina, and Erich Draganits. “Early Bronze Age Bone Tubes from the Aegean: Archaeological Context, Use and Distribution.” Archeometriai Műhely [Archaeometry Workshop] (2013): 179–192.

Shpuza, Ermanl. “Allometry in the Syntax of Street Networks: Evolution of Adriatic and Ionian Coastal Cities 1800–2010.” Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design (2014). doi:doi:10.1068/b39109.

Siek, Thomas James. “A Study in Paleo-Oncology: On the Identification of Neoplastic Disease in Archaeological Bone.” Master of Arts Thesis, University of Waterloo, 2014. 

Thein, Alexander. “Reflecting on Sulla’s Clemency.” Historia 63, no. 2 (April 1, 2014): 166–186.

Toffolo, Michael B., Alexander Fantalkin, Irene S. Lemos, Rainer C. S. Felsch, Wolf-Dietrich Niemeier, Guy D. R. Sanders, Israel Finkelstein, and Elisabetta Boaretto. “Towards an Absolute Chronology for the Aegean Iron Age: New Radiocarbon Dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth.” PLoS ONE 8, no. 12 (December 26, 2013): e83117. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083117.

Waterfield, Robin. Taken at the Flood: The Roman Conquest of Greece. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Williams, Drake, and H. H. “‘Imitate Me’: Interpreting Imitation In 1 Corinthians in Relation to Ignatius of Antioch.” Perichoresis 11, no. 1 (June 1, 2013): 77–95.

Wright, Christopher. The Gattilusio Lordships and the Aegean World 1355-1462. Leiden: Brill, 2014.

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“Now is the day of salvation”

It’s one of those happy years when eastern and western Christian calendars coincide and Lenten seasons begin and conclude in the same weeks. Last year these movable seasons were five weeks off so that Orthodox Christians were in the heart of their fasts while Catholics and Protestants were feasting and singing the Hallelujahs. (And for anyone attending western services in, say, countries like Greece, that is a big drag, as I discovered in 2005). Even those on the Old Calendar will celebrate Pascha on April 20. 

For the Lenten season this year, I plan on running a little weekly series on resources in reading and understanding 1 and 2 Corinthians. As any reader knows, plan” is a fluid word here at Corinthian Matters since busy semesters and greater priorities frequently disappoint my good intentions. But, if I can stay on my game, I’ll put together a series of posts reviewing scholarship, sites, and studies of the apostle Paul’s Corinthian correspondence directed to broader audiences. Indeed, I’ll be thinking a bit about these issues as I’ve been asked to give a Lenten series at my own church in Harrisburg on 1 Corinthians. My series is titled “Meeting the Corinthians”.

So, today, on this ashen Wednesday, the reading that many Christians in western churches will hear comes from 2 Corinthians 5:20-6:10. Here is the New Revised Standard Version from the Lectionary Page (in the Episcopal tradition):

We entreat you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

As we work together with him, we urge you also not to accept the grace of God in vain. For he says,

‘At an acceptable time I have listened to you,
and on a day of salvation I have helped you.’

See, now is the acceptable time; see, now is the day of salvation! We are putting no obstacle in anyone’s way, so that no fault may be found with our ministry, but as servants of God we have commended ourselves in every way: through great endurance, in afflictions, hardships, calamities, beatings, imprisonments, riots, labors, sleepless nights, hunger; by purity, knowledge, patience, kindness, holiness of spirit, genuine love, truthful speech, and the power of God; with the weapons of righteousness for the right hand and for the left; in honor and dishonor, in ill repute and good repute. We are treated as impostors, and yet are true; as unknown, and yet are well known; as dying, and see– we are alive; as punished, and yet not killed; as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing everything.”

Posted in Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - St. Paul | Leave a comment

Preserving the Ancient Diolkos

Some time ago, I summarized the degradation of the diolkos of Corinth over the last several decades. This piece on Enet.gr from June 2013 (in Greek) suggests official plans underway to fund a concrete embankment on the eastern side of the diolkos that would protect the pavements of the trans-Isthmus road from the continuing erosion by currents, winds, and wave action from the nearby canal.

The study and project have been proposed by the Central Archaeological Council in collaboration with the Ministry of the Environment, with a projected cost of 2.5 million Euro. The pavements of the diolkos now submerged would be lifted and supported to their original location. Large concrete blocks (4-6 m in dimension) reinforced with stone embankments would be placed east of the run of the excavated diolkos.

Not sure what, if anything, will become of this but a major project of this sort is overdue – in light of the road’s importance for the historiography of the Corinthia — and the proposed plan for an embankment seems like a reasonable approach. Vetting this on Corinthian Studies FB suggests that the plan has not moved forward since June.

For some sense of the destruction of the diolkos over the last fifty years….

This is a photo of the diolkos (facing southeast) near the Corinthian Gulf as it originally appeared in the early 1960s after excavation:

Praktika Athenais Image 103_m

My photo of the diolkos (facing northwest) after 50 years of erosion:

Corinthia 190

And a neat visual from the article of a planned embankment with pedestrian walkway that would protect the monument (facing northwest).

Posted in Canal, Diolkos, Modern Corinthia, News Stories | Leave a comment

Coming Soon: The Roman Conquest of Greece

A new book on the Roman conquest of Greece – which ends in the destruction of Corinth. Coming April 2014.

Waterfield, Robin. Taken at the Flood: The Roman Conquest of Greece. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Here’s the book description from Amazon:

Taken at the Flood

“Is there anyone on earth who is so narrow-minded or uninquisitive that he could fail to want to know how and thanks to what kind of political system almost the entire known world was conquered and brought under a single empire in less than fifty-three years?” –Polybius, Histories

The 53-year period Polybius had in mind stretched from the start of the Second Punic War in 219 BCE until 167, when Rome overthrew the Macedonian monarchy and divided the country into four independent republics. This was the crucial half-century of Rome’s spectacular rise to imperial status, but Roman interest in its eastern neighbors began a little earlier, with the First Illyrian War of 229, and climaxed later with the infamous destruction of Corinth in 146.

Taken at the Flood chronicles this momentous move by Rome into the Greek east. Until now, this period of history has been overshadowed by the threat of Carthage in the west, but events in the east were no less important in themselves, and Robin Waterfield’s account reveals the peculiar nature of Rome’s eastern policy. For over seventy years, the Romans avoided annexation so that they could commit their military and financial resources to the fight against Carthage and elsewhere. Though ultimately a failure, this policy of indirect rule, punctuated by periodic brutal military interventions and intense diplomacy, worked well for several decades, until the Senate finally settled on more direct forms of control.

Waterfield’s fast-paced narrative focuses mainly on military and diplomatic maneuvers, but throughout he interweaves other topics and themes, such as the influence of Greek culture on Rome, the Roman aristocratic ethos, and the clash between the two best fighting machines the ancient world ever produced: the Macedonian phalanx and Roman legion. The result is an absorbing account of a critical chapter in Rome’s mastery of the Mediterranean.”

And the Table of Contents from Oxford University Press:

Preface
List of Illustrations
Prelude: Clouds in the West
1: The Coming of Rome
2: The Illyrian Wars
3: The First Macedonian War
4: The Second Macedonian War
5: War against Antiochus and the Aetolians
6: Remote Control
7: The Third Macedonian War
8: From Pydna to Corinth
9: A Glimpse into the Future
Key Dates
Cast of Characters
Glossary, Money, Names
Notes
Bibliography
Index


Posted in Bibliography, Book and Article Reviews, Destruction of Corinth, Periods, Hellenistic, Periods, Interim, Periods, Roman | Leave a comment

Corinthiaka

Some miscellaneous Corinthiaka that have slowly aggregated over the last month or so.

Pinterest_Corinth

  • Finding Corinthia images via Google freely available for reuse (h/t to Beth Mark for showing me this trick):

GoogleReuse2

Posted in Canal, Corinthiaka, Corinthian & Saronic Gulfs, Loutraki, News Stories, Periods, Roman, Photos, Urban Center | 1 Comment