The Corinthia Zotero Library: New Organization

Yesterday I discovered batch tagging in Zotero. Instead of manually changing tags one at a time (an incredibly time-consuming process), one can batch tag by dragging a selection of multiple items onto any tag in the tag selector box in the Standalone version of Zotero.

This feature effectively allowed me to tackle the tags in the library. I recategorize all 1,927 items in the Corinthia (Zotero) Bibliography Library in a couple of hours. Manually tagging those items would take days.

The tag categories I’ve created are neither perfect nor complete, but there is now a little more order to the collection than it previously had. Every item has been assigned to one of two major tag categories: .ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY or .NEW TESTAMENT. These show up as the first two tags in the Tags area to the lower left of the Zotero Library (see below). The following image shows the items that appear when one selects on the master tag category .ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY

Zotero_1

An item may belong to both categories in the case of – for example — archaeological and historical scholarship that is directed to or clearly relevant to New Testament studies, or New Testament scholarship that informs the history and archaeology of Corinth. In the following example, I’ve selected both master tag categories and another subcategory “Periods, Hellenistic.”

Zotero_2

I’ve also slid created subfolders for browsing called “New Testament” and “Archaeology and History” for two principal audiences of Corinthian studies. Whether one browses by main tag category or by folder, the results should be the same. Note that all 1,927 individual bibliographic items can be found in the master Library folder. An item in the sub-folder collections also exists in the master folder.

Zotero_3

NB: At the time of this update, the items are still in need of a more thorough tagging, and this will require some manual input. Where I have added tags are for main places in the Corinthia: “Corinth”, “Corinthia” (for territory), “Kenchreai”, “Lechaion”, “Isthmus of Corinth” and “Isthmia”. I’ve also added periods for many (but not all) items, e.g., “Period, Roman.” These period tags parallel the chronological designations used on this website.

For now, the visitor using the server version of the library (and not the stand-alone) should experiment with a combination of direct searches in the search box, tagging, and browsing by subfolder.

One area other that I spent cleaning up this morning was the section on New Testament studies. I’ll write more about this tomorrow.

Posted in Archaeological Discoveries, Bibliography, Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - 2 Corinthians, Digital Corinthia, Periods, Diachronic | Leave a comment

The American School of Classical Studies: Recent Archaeological Work

Let’s face it. Excavation is pretty boring. Hours of tedium, careful digging, and extensive notetaking with occasional glorious bursts of finds and findings (and often: nothing or very little at all). I admit that I still like the process of excavation and get enthusiastic about the prospects of discoveries that change the way we think about the local past – even when we are finding nothing.

Watching the videocast of the open meeting of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens at Athens is like watching a series of ‘highlights’ clips of a sporting event, say, basketball in March Madness (or, perhaps more accurately, like an average basketball game during regular season since the March Madness games tend to keep the attention). In these open meetings, the director offers a lecture of archaeological research in the past year both directly sponsored by the school (Corinth and Athens) and fieldwork conducted by the school’s affiliated institutions.

This year’s clip from Director James Wright gives an overview of the work of the school in 2014 and is followed by Merle Langdon’s lecture on “Rupestral Inscriptions in the Greek World”.

The bit on Corinth runs from 5:24 to 8:48 and surveys the programs of preservation and education, including plans for restoration of the Peirene Fountain and South Stoa (with discussion of the famous agonothetes / Isthmian games mosaic), excavations south of the South Stoa (which came down upon 11th century AD fills, a late antique house, and some earlier Roman levels), conservation of the Frankish city just outside of the museum, and educational programs with area schools.

Beyond Corinth, the lecture surveys recent fieldwork in the Athenian agora (near the Stoa Poikile), the Molyvoti Peninsula (in Thrace), Samothrace, Halai, Mitrou, among many others. My video crashed about the 27 minute mark yesterday so I’m not sure what lies beyond.

Posted in American School Excavations, Conferences, Lectures, and Presentations, Periods, Byzantine, Periods, Frankish, Periods, Late Antiquity, Periods, Roman, Urban Center, Video | 7 Comments

A New Book on Delphi

I was excited to see this new book on Delphi is now available for purchase via Princeton University publisher and Amazon — well ahead of the April 2 publication date originally noted by the publisher. I’ll try to run a review in the next few months. The work is relevant to Corinthian studies both because of the parallel Pan-Hellenic sanctuary at Isthmia and Corinth’s own ancient reputation as a geographic center between east and west.

Michael Scott, Delphi: A History of the Center of the Ancient World, Princeton 2014: Princeton University Press.

Cloth | 2014 | $29.95 / £19.95 | ISBN: 9780691150819

448 pp. | 6 x 9 | 8 color illus. 41 halftones. 3 maps.

eBook | ISBN: 9781400851324

The abstract from the publisher page suggests a comprehensive history of this important ancient sanctuary.

“The oracle and sanctuary of the Greek god Apollo at Delphi were known as the “omphalos”–the “center” or “navel”–of the ancient world for more than 1000 years. Individuals, city leaders, and kings came from all over the Mediterranean and beyond to consult Delphi’s oracular priestess; to set up monuments to the gods in gold, ivory, bronze, marble, and stone; and to take part in athletic and musical competitions. This book provides the first comprehensive narrative history of this extraordinary sanctuary and city, from its founding to its modern rediscovery, to show more clearly than ever before why Delphi was one of the most important places in the ancient world for so long.

In this richly illustrated account, Michael Scott covers the whole history and nature of Delphi, from the literary and archaeological evidence surrounding the site, to its rise as a center of worship with a wide variety of religious practices, to the constant appeal of the oracle despite her cryptic prophecies. He describes how Delphi became a contested sacred site for Greeks and Romans and a storehouse for the treasures of rival city-states and foreign kings. He also examines the eventual decline of the site and how its meaning and importance have continued to be reshaped right up to the present. Finally, for the modern visitor to Delphi, he includes a brief guide that highlights key things to see and little-known treasures.

A unique window into the center of the ancient world, Delphi will appeal to general readers, tourists, students, and specialists.”

Table of Contents:

Acknowledgments xi
Maps xiii
Prologue: Why Delphi? 1

Part I: Some are born great
1: Oracle 9
2: Beginnings 31
3: Transformation 51
4: Rebirth 71

Part II : Some achieve greatness
5: Fire 93
6: Domination 119
7: Renewal 139
8: Transition 163

Part III: Some have greatness thrust upon them
9: A New World 183
10: Renaissance 203
11: Final Glory? 223
12: The Journey Continues 245

Epilogue: Unearthing Delphi 269
Conclusion 285
Guide: A Brief Tour of the Delphi Site and Museum 291
Abbreviations 303
Notes 309
Bibliography 375
Index 401

Posted in Book and Article Reviews, Isthmia, Periods, Diachronic | 1 Comment

Greece in Getty Images

Last week, Getty Images announced that millions of its creative and high-quality images can be freely used on blogs, websites, twitter, and other social media through the image’s embed code. This is not quite the same as permission to download and use in, say, presentations and lectures but this is still a plus for anyone who creates blogs or dynamic websites and needs stock photos.

A search by the keyword “Greece” returns 35,882 images, “Corinth” 144 images, “Mycenae” 73, “Athens” 6121, “Naxos” 266, etc… 

Embedding the image is easy as these instructions indicate.

GettyImages

Some things you should know about the use of the images:

  • You cannot download them or upload them
  • You cannot resize them
  • Many of the returns on keyword searches lack embed codes. I cannot find how to filter by embed code ‘on.’

I played around with this for a few minutes and selected some samples. This is how they appear after copying the embed codes into Live Writer.


 



Language about use from their terms of service:

Where enabled, you may embed Getty Images Content on a website, blog or social media platform using the embedded viewer (the “Embedded Viewer”). Not all Getty Images Content will be available for embedded use, and availability may change without notice. Getty Images reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove Getty Images Content from the Embedded Viewer. Upon request, you agree to take prompt action to stop using the Embedded Viewer and/or Getty Images Content. You may only use embedded Getty Images Content for editorial purposes (meaning relating to events that are newsworthy or of public interest). Embedded Getty Images Content may not be used: (a) for any commercial purpose (for example, in advertising, promotions or merchandising) or to suggest endorsement or sponsorship; (b) in violation of any stated restriction; (c) in a defamatory, pornographic or otherwise unlawful manner; or (d) outside of the context of the Embedded Viewer.

Posted in Digital Corinthia, Photos | Leave a comment

Call for Papers: Byzantine Maritime Technology and Trade

I was happy to see that the Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group of the Archaeological Institute of America is (co-)sponsoring another session for next year’s annual meeting in New Orleans. Here are the details for submission.

***********************************************************************

Proposed Colloquium Session for the 2015 AIA Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Jan. 8-11, 2015 Sponsored by: AIA Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University

Organizers: Rebecca Ingram and Michael Jones, Institute of Nautical Archaeology

Session Overview:

Maritime activity played a vital role in the political and economic success of the Byzantine Empire. Recent fieldwork, both on land and underwater, offers a tantalizing glimpse into the complexity of the Byzantine maritime world. The 58,000 m2 rescue excavation of the Theodosian Harbor in the heart of Istanbul, begun in 2004, is perhaps the most significant of these new discoveries, yielding the remains of 37 Byzantine shipwrecks and tens of thousands of artifacts related to maritime trade, shipbuilding technology, and daily life in Constantinople from the late 4th to the early 11th century. However, because the Yenikapı finds are from the hub of a vast maritime network, they cannot be understood in isolation. Along with the finds from Yenikapı, results from recent studies involving shipwrecks, surveys and excavations of harbor sites, and studies of long-distance trade goods are poised to make a significant contribution to our understanding of Byzantine trade, society, and culture. In order to examine this new data within the proper overall context of late antique and Byzantine archaeology, this colloquium session, co-sponsored by the AIA Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, will present new discoveries from a range of sites concerning maritime activity in this period. This session aims to bring together archaeologists who focus on topics such as ship construction, harbors, metrology, coastal settlement, and maritime trade goods in the Byzantine world. By seeking greater integration between research from terrestrial and nautical archaeological sites, this session will provide an appropriate venue for the dissemination of recent finds and will shed new light on our understanding of the Byzantine Empire and its neighbors.

If you are interested in participating in this colloquium session, please complete the attached form and return it to Rebecca Ingram (rsingram@charter.net) or Michael Jones (rsingram@charter.net) by Friday, March 21, 2014. You will receive an email by the end of March with additional information.

Posted in Conferences, Lectures, and Presentations, Periods, Byzantine, Periods, Late Antiquity, Periods, Medieval, Trade and Commerce | 1 Comment

Pope Francis on Poverty and the Logic of Divine Love

When Palladius, the author of the Lausiac History, wanted to expose a pseudo-monk named Valens in the early fifth century AD, he called him “a Corinthian—for St. Paul charged the Corinthians with arrogance.” St. Ambrose, the powerful bishop of Milan and one of the so-called “doctors” of the western church, commented on 1 Corinthians 5:1 that “the house of Corinth stank…There was a stench, for a little leaven had corrupted the whole lump.”

Justifiably or not, the earliest worshipers of Christ in Corinth were remembered in church history as the Christian community with problems. St. Paul enumerates them in the first letter to the Corinthians in rapid succession: problems of vanity, division, arrogance and power (Ch. 1-4); problems of sex, lawsuits, and marriage (Ch. 5-7), problems of idolatry and arrogance (again!) (Ch. 8-10), problems of worship and division (again) (Ch. 11-14), and problems of belief (Ch. 15). Reading the letter straightforwardly and literally, one could only conclude with Basil of Caesarea that “Those in Corinth were infants, in need of milk.”

When I gave my first presentation on Christianity in Corinth yesterday evening at the Cathedral Parish of St. Patrick (Harrisburg, PA), I noted that it was precisely the humanness of the Corinthian community that has (historically) made the Corinthian correspondence a frequent subject of commentary and teaching.

It also explains why passages from 1 and 2 Corinthians are used in eastern and western liturgical cycles during the season of Lent. With the themes of self-denial, renunciation, spiritual exercise, and charity, the letters offer a wide range of instructive teaching for spiritual pilgrimage. There are passages about repentance, conversion, and reconciliation (2 Cor. 5:17-6.2); the foolishness of Christ crucified and the message of the cross (1 Cor. 1:18-25); spiritual food and drink and temptation in the wilderness (1 Cor. 10.1-3); endurance through temptations and trials (2 Cor. 5:20-6:10); power in weakness (2 Cor. 4:6-15); and the celebration of the Paschal feast (1 Cor. 5:6-8; 11:23-26). And the long passage about resurrection in 1 Corinthians (1 Cor. 15) is regularly used at the season’s conclusion in Easter Sunday.

For this week’s Lenten Wednesday series, Pope Francis reflects on a passage of 2 Corinthians less commonly associated with the season — or at least in the cycle of readings. In 2 Corinthians 8:9, St. Paul puts voluntary poverty at the heart of the incarnation: “For you know the generous act of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, so that by his poverty you might become rich.” (NRSV)

In his first Lenten message, Pope Francis discusses the mystery of poverty in the incarnation and the logic of divine love. I copy the opening of the message below. You can read the full sermon in English here.

“Dear Brothers and Sisters,

As Lent draws near, I would like to offer some helpful thoughts on our path of conversion as individuals and as a community. These insights are inspired by the words of Saint Paul: “For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that by his poverty you might become rich” (2 Cor8:9). The Apostle was writing to the Christians of Corinth to encourage them to be generous in helping the faithful in Jerusalem who were in need. What do these words of Saint Paul mean for us Christians today? What does this invitation to poverty, a life of evangelical poverty, mean for us today?

1. Christ’s grace

First of all, it shows us how God works. He does not reveal himself cloaked in worldly power and wealth but rather in weakness and poverty: “though He was rich, yet for your sake he became poor …”. Christ, the eternal Son of God, one with the Father in power and glory, chose to be poor; he came amongst us and drew near to each of us; he set aside his glory and emptied himself so that he could be like us in all things (cf. Phil2:7; Heb 4:15). God’s becoming man is a great mystery! But the reason for all this is his love, a love which is grace, generosity, a desire to draw near, a love which does not hesitate to offer itself in sacrifice for the beloved. Charity, love, is sharing with the one we love in all things. Love makes us similar, it creates equality, it breaks down walls and eliminates distances. God did this with us. Indeed, Jesus “worked with human hands, thought with a human mind, acted by human choice and loved with a human heart. Born of the Virgin Mary, he truly became one of us, like us in all things except sin.” (Gaudium et Spes, 22).”………..

Posted in Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - Saints, Christian - St. Paul | Leave a comment

Coming Soon: The Apocalypse

A new Oxford Handbook due April 14, with obvious relevance for understanding the broader ancient context for particular passages in 1 and 2 Corinthians such as Paul’s vision and the third heaven (2 Corinthians 12:1-4), the parousia and the resurrection of the dead (1 Corinthians 15), the passing world and last times (1 Cor. 7:29-31):

  • Collins, John J., ed. The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

You can preorder via Amazon. The description of the book at OUP website:

The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature

“Apocalypticism arose in ancient Judaism in the last centuries BCE and played a crucial role in the rise of Christianity. It is not only of historical interest: there has been a growing awareness, especially since the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, of the prevalence of apocalyptic beliefs in the contemporary world. To understand these beliefs, it is necessary to appreciate their complex roots in the ancient world, and the multi-faceted character of the phenomenon of apocalypticism.

The Oxford Handbook of Apocalyptic Literature is a thematic and phenomenological exploration of apocalypticism in the Judaic and Christian traditions. Most of the volume is devoted to the apocalyptic literature of antiquity. Essays explore the relationship between apocalypticism and prophecy, wisdom and mysticism; the social function of apocalypticism and its role as resistance literature; apocalyptic rhetoric from both historical and postmodern perspectives; and apocalyptic theology, focusing on phenomena of determinism and dualism and exploring apocalyptic theology’s role in ancient Judaism, early Christianity, and Gnosticism.

The final chapters of the volume are devoted to the appropriation of apocalypticism in the modern world, reviewing the role of apocalypticism in contemporary Judaism and Christianity, and more broadly in popular culture, addressing the increasingly studied relation between apocalypticism and violence, and discussing the relationship between apocalypticism and trauma, which speaks to the underlying causes of the popularity of apocalyptic beliefs. This volume will further the understanding of a vital religious phenomenon too often dismissed as alien and irrational by secular western society.

Readership: Students and scholars of the Bible, apocalyptic literature, theology, and history, millennialism, Judaic and Christian traditions”

The Table of Contents from the same OUP page:

Contributors
Preface
1. What is Apocalyptic Literature? – John J. Collins

Part I. The Literary and Phenomenological Context
2. Apocalyptic Prophecy – Stephen L. Cook
3. The Inheritance of Prophecy in Apocalypse – Hindy Najman
4. Wisdom and Apocalypticism – Matthew Goff
5. Scriptural Interpretation in Early Jewish Apocalypses – Alex P. Jassen
6. Apocalyptic Literature and the Study of Early Jewish Mysticism – Ra’anan Boustan and Patrick G. McCullough
7. Dreams and Visions in Early Jewish and Early Christian Apocalypses and Apocalypticism – Frances Flannery

Part II. The Social Function of Apocalyptic Literature
8. Social-Scientific Approaches to Apocalyptic Literature – Philip F. Esler
9. Jewish Apocalyptic Literature as Resistance Literature – Anathea Portier-Young
10. Apocalypse and Empire - Stephen J. Friesen
11. A Postcolonial Reading of Apocalyptic Literature – Daniel L. Smith-Christopher

Part III. Literary Features of Apocalyptic Literature
12. The Rhetoric of Jewish Apocalyptic Literature – Carol A. Newsom
13. Early Christian Apocalyptic Rhetoric – Greg Carey
14. Deconstructing Apocalyptic Literalist Allegory – Erin Runions

Part IV. Apocalyptic Theology
15. Apocalyptic Determinism – Mladen Popovic
16. Apocalyptic Dualism – Jörg Frey
17. Apocalyptic Ethics and Behavior – Dale C. Allison, Jr.
18. Apocalypse and Torah in Ancient Judaism – Matthias Henze
19. Apocalypticism and Christian Origins – Adela Yarbro Collins
20. Descents to Hell and Ascents to Heaven in Apocalyptic Literature – Jan N. Bremmer
21. Apocalypses amongst Gnostics and Manichaeans – Dylan M. Burns
22. The Imagined World of the Apocalypses – Stefan Beyerle

Part V. Apocalypse Now
23. Messianism as a Political Power in Contemporary Judaism -Motti Inbari
24. Apocalypticism and Radicalism – Christopher Rowland
25. Apocalypse and Violence – Catherine Wessinger
26. Apocalypticism in Contemporary Christianity – Amy Johnson Frykholm
27. Apocalypse and Trauma – Dereck Daschke
28. Apocalypticism and Popular Culture – Lorenzo DiTommaso

Index

Posted in Christian - 1 Corinthians, Christian - 2 Corinthians, Christian - St. Paul | Leave a comment