The Complete Archaeology of Greece

John Bintliff’s new tome (May 2012) looks like a serious comprehensive work.  At 544 pages, The Complete Archaeology of Greece: From Hunter-Gatherers to the 20th Century A.D. promises to tell the story of Greek culture from the Paleolithic to the modern era.  It doesn’t get much more comprehensive than this.

Here’s the description from the Wiley-Blackwell website.

The Complete Archaeology of Greece covers the incredible richness and variety of Greek culture and its central role in our understanding of European civilization, from the Palaeolithic era of 400,000 years ago to the early modern period. In a single volume, the field’s traditional focus on art and architecture has been combined with a rigorous overview of the latest archaeological evidence forming a truly comprehensive work on Greek civilization.

  • A unique single-volume exploration of the extraordinary development of human society in Greece from the earliest human traces up till the early 20th century AD
  • Provides 22 chapters and an introduction chronologically surveying the phases of Greek culture, with over 200 illustrations
  • Features over 200 images of art, architecture, and ancient texts, and integrates new archaeological discoveries for a more detailed picture of the Greece past, its landscape, and its people
  • Explains how scientific advances in archaeology have provided a broader perspective on Greek prehistory and history
  • Offers extensive notes on the text, available online, including additional details and references for the serious researcher and amateur

And here is the table of contents.  Judging from the index, the Corinthia makes a very good showing.  There’s even some discussion of the Eastern Korinthia Survey.

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Categories: Acrocorinth, Agriculture, Archaeological Survey, Books and Articles, Ceramics, EKAS (Eastern Korinthia Archaeological Survey), Isthmus, Sites, Isthmia, Sites, Lechaion, Territory

1 Comment

  1. John Bintliff

    Dear David thanks for the plug, indeed the Busy Countryside and your views on Roman and Late Roman ceramics are very influential within it, and other aspects of the ECS
    John

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