People Under Power: Early Christian and Jewish Responses (Lebahn and Lehtipuu)

This new book edited by Labahn and Lehtipuu looks broadly relevant to the study of Judaism and early Christianity at Corinth and the Corinthian correspondence with all its emphasis on power and weakness:

Labahn, Michael, and Outi Lehtipuu, eds. People under Power: Early Jewish and Christian Responses to the Roman Power Empire. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2015.

The book, which will be out next month, has chapters devoted to Jewish communities under empire, the New Testament within the context of empire, and early Christian texts in light of imperial ideologies.

 

According to the publisher page, “This volume presents a batch of incisive new essays on the relationship between Roman imperial power and ideology and Christian and Jewish life and thought within the empire. Employing diverse methodologies that include historical criticism, rhetorical criticism, postcolonial criticism, and social historical studies, the contributors offer fresh perspectives on a question that is crucial for our understanding not only of the late Roman Empire, but also of the growth and change of Christianity and Judaism in the imperial period.”

 

I’ve transcribed the Table of Contents below (with a more readable PDF version here)

Table of Contents: 

Introduction: Christians, Jews, and Roman Power (Outi Lehtipuu & Michael Labahn)

Part I Jewish Communities in the Shadows of the Empire

“The Kittim and Hints of Hybridity in the Dead Sea Scrolls” (George J. Brooke, University of Manchester)

“The Politics of Exclusion: Expulsions of Jews and Others from Rome” (Birgit van der Lans, University of Groningen)

“”Μεμορια Iudati patiri”: Some Notes to the Study of the Beginnings of Jewish Presence in Roman Pannonia” (Nóra Dávid, University of Vienna)

Part II Contextualizing New Testament Texts with the Empire

“Imperial Politics in Paul: Scholarly Phantom or Actual Textual Phenomenon?” (Anders Klostergaard Petersen, University of Aarhus)

“Das Markusevangelium – eine ideologie- und imperiumskritische Schrift? Ein Blick in die Auslegungsgeschichte” (Martin Meiser, Universität des Saarlandes)

“„Ein Beispiel habe ich euch gegeben…“ (Joh 13,15): Die Diakonie Jesu und die Diakonie der Christen in der johanneischen Fußwaschungserzählung als Konterkarierung römischer Alltagskultur” (Klaus Scholtissek, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena)

Part III Imperial Ideology and Other Early Christian Texts

“The Shepherd of Hermas and the Roman Empire” (Mark R. C. Grundeken, Catholic University of Leuven)

“Noble Death or Death Cult? Pagan Criticism of Early Christian Martyrdom” (Paul Middleton, University of Chester)

“Nero Redivivus as a Subject of Early Christian Arcane Teaching” (Marco Frenschkowski, University of Leipzig)

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Categories: Books and Articles, Periods, Late Antiquity, Periods, Roman, Religion, 1 Corinthians, Religion, 2 Corinthians, Religion, Judaism

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