A new book on Corinth in Late Antiquity

For some time I have been following alerts that Amelia Brown’s book on Corinth in Late Antiquity is almost out. The publisher, I.B. Tauris still lists it as not yet published, and Amazon shows it will be available for order next month. But Google Books still got hold of a copy and has posted parts of the front matter and introduction in a typically snippety way. Here are the details:

Amelia R. Brown, Corinth in Late Antiquity : A Greek, Roman and Christian City , 2018: I.B. Tauris.

 

The abstract indicates a wide-ranging survey of Corinth in late antiquity:

Late antique Corinth was on the frontline of the radical political, economic and religious transformations that swept across the Mediterranean world from the second to sixth centuries CE. A strategic merchant city, it became a hugely important metropolis in Roman Greece and, later, a key focal point for early Christianity. In late antiquity, Corinthians recognised new Christian authorities; adopted novel rites of civic celebration and decoration; and destroyed, rebuilt and added to the city’s ancient landscape and monuments. Drawing on evidence from ancient literary sources, extensive archaeological excavations and historical records, Amelia Brown here surveys this period of urban transformation, from the old Agora and temples to new churches and fortifications. Influenced by the methodological advances of urban studies, Brown demonstrates the many ways Corinthians responded to internal and external pressures by building, demolishing and repurposing urban public space, thus transforming Corinthian society, civic identity and urban infrastructure.

In a departure from isolated textual and archaeological studies, she connects this process to broader changes in metropolitan life, contributing to the present understanding of urban experience in the late antique Mediterranean.

And the outline of chapters shows a thematic approach oriented around key spatial features of Corinth’s urban topography:

Introduction: Significance, Scholarship and Structure

  1. Landscape and Civic Authorities in Late Antique Corinth
  2. The Forum and Spaces of Civic Administration
  3. Commerce, Water Supply and Communications
  4. Spaces of Civic Assembly and Entertainment
  5. Creation and Destruction of Public Sculpture
  6. Sacred Spaces around the Forum
  7. Sacred Spaces in the City and Corinthia
  8. Fortification Walls: Isthmus, City and Acrocorinth

A couple of appendixes follow.

The book revises Brown’s dissertation. Anyone who knows Brown’s scholarship knows her incredible abilities for crafting narratives through synthesis of a wide range of evidence. This should be a fulsome book that sets the record straight on Corinth in late antiquity and dismisses that outdated old idea of a city in decline. Now someone please send me a review copy.

Advertisements

Categories: Books and Articles, Periods, Late Antiquity, Sites, Urban Center

1 Comment

  1. Amelia Brown

    Thanks for the kind words! Corinth in Late Antiquity is available in the UK from the publisher IB Tauris, and will be released in the US soon. I’ll send you a review copy this week! Cheers, Amelia

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s